Participation is fundamental to BEING’s key purpose of ensuring that mental health consumer views are heard by policy makers, service providers and the community.

Participation for people who experience mental illness is both important to assist in making important decisions in things such as one’s treatment choice, but also in providing feedback and input to policy makers, health services, advocacy organisations such as BEING, and the government about how best to shape service delivery in the future. Participation also refers to how people living with mental illness can be engaged in the community, employment, training and education.

Participation is beneficial for people who live with mental illness, and it has been shown that people with access to social networks cope better with the challenges they face in life.

Do you want to get more involved with BEING? Here are some ways that you can do that:

Alternatives to Suicide Forum

February 7, 2018

Time: 10am – 1pm (Registrations open at 9.30) Date: Friday 9th March 2018 Location: Glebe Town Hall, 160 St Johns Road Glebe NSW Alternatives to Suicide is an innovative peer led suicide prevention program from the Massachusetts Recovery Learning Community (USA). Being and inside out & associates australia are pleased to bring Caroline Mazel-Carlton and […]

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NDIS WentWest Consultation Update

January 12, 2018

In September, Elena and Kirsten attended WentWest in Western Sydney to hold a consultation about the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and mental health. The NDIS has been available in the Western Sydney area since July 2016. People spoke about their experiences accessing the NDIS. In particular, attendees echoed what other people have said, including […]

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Queanbeyan Consultation Update

January 12, 2018

In September 2017, Elena and Kirsten visited Queanbeyan and sat down with some local people to talk about what is happening in this area in mental health and wellbeing. Some of the key themes that came out of the consultation were: a lack of services in regional and rural areas; difficulty in getting access to […]

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